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The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha

The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha

The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha. Kabul, Afghanistan. 27/11/2009.

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The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid alAdha188921
01/12
Caption
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha. Kabul, Afghanistan. 27/11/2009. The Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha commemorates Ibrahim’s commitment to sacrifice his own son in obedience of God’s request. Each year, on this occasion, all who can afford to do so sacrifice an animal (usually a cow, sheep or goat) and distribute the meat in three parts; one third is distributed within the family, one third is distributed to neighbours and friends, and one third is distributed amongst the poor. Under Islamic law a Muslim is prohibited from eating the meat of an animal unless the blood has been drained from the carcass. For this reason the Halal (legal) method is used to kill the animal. This technique involves making a deep cut at the neck to ensure a rapid purging of blood from the animal. The head is not removed until most of the blood is drained and the meat is purified. The cow, which was purchased for US$500, is first bound tightly by the man who is employed to undertake the sacrifice. Bonds are made at the legs and around the body to reduce excess movement which might prolong consciousness during the first moments of the sacrifice. As the first cut is made “b-ismi-llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīm” (In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful) is whispered into the cow’s ear, supposedly because it prevents the animal experiencing pain. Men who have come in to Kabul from the provinces knock on the doors of Kabuli residences to seek employment in cutting and preparing the meat. In this case, three men of the Hazara tribe work alongside family members to chop, cut and separate the various parts of the cow once the animal has died.
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid alAdha189243
02/12
Caption
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha. Kabul, Afghanistan. 27/11/2009. The Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha commemorates Ibrahim’s commitment to sacrifice his own son in obedience of God’s request. Each year, on this occasion, all who can afford to do so sacrifice an animal (usually a cow, sheep or goat) and distribute the meat in three parts; one third is distributed within the family, one third is distributed to neighbours and friends, and one third is distributed amongst the poor. Under Islamic law a Muslim is prohibited from eating the meat of an animal unless the blood has been drained from the carcass. For this reason the Halal (legal) method is used to kill the animal. This technique involves making a deep cut at the neck to ensure a rapid purging of blood from the animal. The head is not removed until most of the blood is drained and the meat is purified. The cow, which was purchased for US$500, is first bound tightly by the man who is employed to undertake the sacrifice. Bonds are made at the legs and around the body to reduce excess movement which might prolong consciousness during the first moments of the sacrifice. As the first cut is made “b-ismi-llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīm” (In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful) is whispered into the cow’s ear, supposedly because it prevents the animal experiencing pain. Men who have come in to Kabul from the provinces knock on the doors of Kabuli residences to seek employment in cutting and preparing the meat. In this case, three men of the Hazara tribe work alongside family members to chop, cut and separate the various parts of the cow once the animal has died.
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid alAdha189241
03/12
Caption
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha. Kabul, Afghanistan. 27/11/2009. The Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha commemorates Ibrahim’s commitment to sacrifice his own son in obedience of God’s request. Each year, on this occasion, all who can afford to do so sacrifice an animal (usually a cow, sheep or goat) and distribute the meat in three parts; one third is distributed within the family, one third is distributed to neighbours and friends, and one third is distributed amongst the poor. Under Islamic law a Muslim is prohibited from eating the meat of an animal unless the blood has been drained from the carcass. For this reason the Halal (legal) method is used to kill the animal. This technique involves making a deep cut at the neck to ensure a rapid purging of blood from the animal. The head is not removed until most of the blood is drained and the meat is purified. The cow, which was purchased for US$500, is first bound tightly by the man who is employed to undertake the sacrifice. Bonds are made at the legs and around the body to reduce excess movement which might prolong consciousness during the first moments of the sacrifice. As the first cut is made “b-ismi-llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīm” (In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful) is whispered into the cow’s ear, supposedly because it prevents the animal experiencing pain. Men who have come in to Kabul from the provinces knock on the doors of Kabuli residences to seek employment in cutting and preparing the meat. In this case, three men of the Hazara tribe work alongside family members to chop, cut and separate the various parts of the cow once the animal has died.
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid alAdha189222
04/12
Caption
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha. Kabul, Afghanistan. 27/11/2009. The Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha commemorates Ibrahim’s commitment to sacrifice his own son in obedience of God’s request. Each year, on this occasion, all who can afford to do so sacrifice an animal (usually a cow, sheep or goat) and distribute the meat in three parts; one third is distributed within the family, one third is distributed to neighbours and friends, and one third is distributed amongst the poor. Under Islamic law a Muslim is prohibited from eating the meat of an animal unless the blood has been drained from the carcass. For this reason the Halal (legal) method is used to kill the animal. This technique involves making a deep cut at the neck to ensure a rapid purging of blood from the animal. The head is not removed until most of the blood is drained and the meat is purified. The cow, which was purchased for US$500, is first bound tightly by the man who is employed to undertake the sacrifice. Bonds are made at the legs and around the body to reduce excess movement which might prolong consciousness during the first moments of the sacrifice. As the first cut is made “b-ismi-llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīm” (In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful) is whispered into the cow’s ear, supposedly because it prevents the animal experiencing pain. Men who have come in to Kabul from the provinces knock on the doors of Kabuli residences to seek employment in cutting and preparing the meat. In this case, three men of the Hazara tribe work alongside family members to chop, cut and separate the various parts of the cow once the animal has died.
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid alAdha189221
05/12
Caption
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha. Kabul, Afghanistan. 27/11/2009. The Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha commemorates Ibrahim’s commitment to sacrifice his own son in obedience of God’s request. Each year, on this occasion, all who can afford to do so sacrifice an animal (usually a cow, sheep or goat) and distribute the meat in three parts; one third is distributed within the family, one third is distributed to neighbours and friends, and one third is distributed amongst the poor. Under Islamic law a Muslim is prohibited from eating the meat of an animal unless the blood has been drained from the carcass. For this reason the Halal (legal) method is used to kill the animal. This technique involves making a deep cut at the neck to ensure a rapid purging of blood from the animal. The head is not removed until most of the blood is drained and the meat is purified. The cow, which was purchased for US$500, is first bound tightly by the man who is employed to undertake the sacrifice. Bonds are made at the legs and around the body to reduce excess movement which might prolong consciousness during the first moments of the sacrifice. As the first cut is made “b-ismi-llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīm” (In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful) is whispered into the cow’s ear, supposedly because it prevents the animal experiencing pain. Men who have come in to Kabul from the provinces knock on the doors of Kabuli residences to seek employment in cutting and preparing the meat. In this case, three men of the Hazara tribe work alongside family members to chop, cut and separate the various parts of the cow once the animal has died.
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid alAdha189220
06/12
Caption
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha. Kabul, Afghanistan. 27/11/2009. The Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha commemorates Ibrahim’s commitment to sacrifice his own son in obedience of God’s request. Each year, on this occasion, all who can afford to do so sacrifice an animal (usually a cow, sheep or goat) and distribute the meat in three parts; one third is distributed within the family, one third is distributed to neighbours and friends, and one third is distributed amongst the poor. Under Islamic law a Muslim is prohibited from eating the meat of an animal unless the blood has been drained from the carcass. For this reason the Halal (legal) method is used to kill the animal. This technique involves making a deep cut at the neck to ensure a rapid purging of blood from the animal. The head is not removed until most of the blood is drained and the meat is purified. The cow, which was purchased for US$500, is first bound tightly by the man who is employed to undertake the sacrifice. Bonds are made at the legs and around the body to reduce excess movement which might prolong consciousness during the first moments of the sacrifice. As the first cut is made “b-ismi-llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīm” (In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful) is whispered into the cow’s ear, supposedly because it prevents the animal experiencing pain. Men who have come in to Kabul from the provinces knock on the doors of Kabuli residences to seek employment in cutting and preparing the meat. In this case, three men of the Hazara tribe work alongside family members to chop, cut and separate the various parts of the cow once the animal has died.
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid alAdha189219
07/12
Caption
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha. Kabul, Afghanistan. 27/11/2009. The Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha commemorates Ibrahim’s commitment to sacrifice his own son in obedience of God’s request. Each year, on this occasion, all who can afford to do so sacrifice an animal (usually a cow, sheep or goat) and distribute the meat in three parts; one third is distributed within the family, one third is distributed to neighbours and friends, and one third is distributed amongst the poor. Under Islamic law a Muslim is prohibited from eating the meat of an animal unless the blood has been drained from the carcass. For this reason the Halal (legal) method is used to kill the animal. This technique involves making a deep cut at the neck to ensure a rapid purging of blood from the animal. The head is not removed until most of the blood is drained and the meat is purified. The cow, which was purchased for US$500, is first bound tightly by the man who is employed to undertake the sacrifice. Bonds are made at the legs and around the body to reduce excess movement which might prolong consciousness during the first moments of the sacrifice. As the first cut is made “b-ismi-llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīm” (In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful) is whispered into the cow’s ear, supposedly because it prevents the animal experiencing pain. Men who have come in to Kabul from the provinces knock on the doors of Kabuli residences to seek employment in cutting and preparing the meat. In this case, three men of the Hazara tribe work alongside family members to chop, cut and separate the various parts of the cow once the animal has died.
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid alAdha189116
08/12
Caption
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha. Kabul, Afghanistan. 27/11/2009. The Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha commemorates Ibrahim’s commitment to sacrifice his own son in obedience of God’s request. Each year, on this occasion, all who can afford to do so sacrifice an animal (usually a cow, sheep or goat) and distribute the meat in three parts; one third is distributed within the family, one third is distributed to neighbours and friends, and one third is distributed amongst the poor. Under Islamic law a Muslim is prohibited from eating the meat of an animal unless the blood has been drained from the carcass. For this reason the Halal (legal) method is used to kill the animal. This technique involves making a deep cut at the neck to ensure a rapid purging of blood from the animal. The head is not removed until most of the blood is drained and the meat is purified. The cow, which was purchased for US$500, is first bound tightly by the man who is employed to undertake the sacrifice. Bonds are made at the legs and around the body to reduce excess movement which might prolong consciousness during the first moments of the sacrifice. As the first cut is made “b-ismi-llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīm” (In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful) is whispered into the cow’s ear, supposedly because it prevents the animal experiencing pain. Men who have come in to Kabul from the provinces knock on the doors of Kabuli residences to seek employment in cutting and preparing the meat. In this case, three men of the Hazara tribe work alongside family members to chop, cut and separate the various parts of the cow once the animal has died.
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid alAdha189115
09/12
Caption
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha. Kabul, Afghanistan. 27/11/2009. The Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha commemorates Ibrahim’s commitment to sacrifice his own son in obedience of God’s request. Each year, on this occasion, all who can afford to do so sacrifice an animal (usually a cow, sheep or goat) and distribute the meat in three parts; one third is distributed within the family, one third is distributed to neighbours and friends, and one third is distributed amongst the poor. Under Islamic law a Muslim is prohibited from eating the meat of an animal unless the blood has been drained from the carcass. For this reason the Halal (legal) method is used to kill the animal. This technique involves making a deep cut at the neck to ensure a rapid purging of blood from the animal. The head is not removed until most of the blood is drained and the meat is purified. The cow, which was purchased for US$500, is first bound tightly by the man who is employed to undertake the sacrifice. Bonds are made at the legs and around the body to reduce excess movement which might prolong consciousness during the first moments of the sacrifice. As the first cut is made “b-ismi-llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīm” (In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful) is whispered into the cow’s ear, supposedly because it prevents the animal experiencing pain. Men who have come in to Kabul from the provinces knock on the doors of Kabuli residences to seek employment in cutting and preparing the meat. In this case, three men of the Hazara tribe work alongside family members to chop, cut and separate the various parts of the cow once the animal has died.
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid alAdha189259
10/12
Caption
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha. Kabul, Afghanistan. 27/11/2009. The Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha commemorates Ibrahim’s commitment to sacrifice his own son in obedience of God’s request. Each year, on this occasion, all who can afford to do so sacrifice an animal (usually a cow, sheep or goat) and distribute the meat in three parts; one third is distributed within the family, one third is distributed to neighbours and friends, and one third is distributed amongst the poor. Under Islamic law a Muslim is prohibited from eating the meat of an animal unless the blood has been drained from the carcass. For this reason the Halal (legal) method is used to kill the animal. This technique involves making a deep cut at the neck to ensure a rapid purging of blood from the animal. The head is not removed until most of the blood is drained and the meat is purified. The cow, which was purchased for US$500, is first bound tightly by the man who is employed to undertake the sacrifice. Bonds are made at the legs and around the body to reduce excess movement which might prolong consciousness during the first moments of the sacrifice. As the first cut is made “b-ismi-llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīm” (In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful) is whispered into the cow’s ear, supposedly because it prevents the animal experiencing pain. Men who have come in to Kabul from the provinces knock on the doors of Kabuli residences to seek employment in cutting and preparing the meat. In this case, three men of the Hazara tribe work alongside family members to chop, cut and separate the various parts of the cow once the animal has died.
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid alAdha189257
11/12
Caption
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha. Kabul, Afghanistan. 27/11/2009. The Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha commemorates Ibrahim’s commitment to sacrifice his own son in obedience of God’s request. Each year, on this occasion, all who can afford to do so sacrifice an animal (usually a cow, sheep or goat) and distribute the meat in three parts; one third is distributed within the family, one third is distributed to neighbours and friends, and one third is distributed amongst the poor. Under Islamic law a Muslim is prohibited from eating the meat of an animal unless the blood has been drained from the carcass. For this reason the Halal (legal) method is used to kill the animal. This technique involves making a deep cut at the neck to ensure a rapid purging of blood from the animal. The head is not removed until most of the blood is drained and the meat is purified. The cow, which was purchased for US$500, is first bound tightly by the man who is employed to undertake the sacrifice. Bonds are made at the legs and around the body to reduce excess movement which might prolong consciousness during the first moments of the sacrifice. As the first cut is made “b-ismi-llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīm” (In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful) is whispered into the cow’s ear, supposedly because it prevents the animal experiencing pain. Men who have come in to Kabul from the provinces knock on the doors of Kabuli residences to seek employment in cutting and preparing the meat. In this case, three men of the Hazara tribe work alongside family members to chop, cut and separate the various parts of the cow once the animal has died.
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid alAdha189256
12/12
Caption
The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha. Kabul, Afghanistan. 27/11/2009. The Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha commemorates Ibrahim’s commitment to sacrifice his own son in obedience of God’s request. Each year, on this occasion, all who can afford to do so sacrifice an animal (usually a cow, sheep or goat) and distribute the meat in three parts; one third is distributed within the family, one third is distributed to neighbours and friends, and one third is distributed amongst the poor. Under Islamic law a Muslim is prohibited from eating the meat of an animal unless the blood has been drained from the carcass. For this reason the Halal (legal) method is used to kill the animal. This technique involves making a deep cut at the neck to ensure a rapid purging of blood from the animal. The head is not removed until most of the blood is drained and the meat is purified. The cow, which was purchased for US$500, is first bound tightly by the man who is employed to undertake the sacrifice. Bonds are made at the legs and around the body to reduce excess movement which might prolong consciousness during the first moments of the sacrifice. As the first cut is made “b-ismi-llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīm” (In the name of God, Most Gracious, Most Merciful) is whispered into the cow’s ear, supposedly because it prevents the animal experiencing pain. Men who have come in to Kabul from the provinces knock on the doors of Kabuli residences to seek employment in cutting and preparing the meat. In this case, three men of the Hazara tribe work alongside family members to chop, cut and separate the various parts of the cow once the animal has died.

The sacrifice of a cow in Kabul on the day of Eid al-Adha. Kabul, Afghanistan. 27/11/2009.

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