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Jonbeel Mela - Traditional Bartering Fair

Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair227996
01/11
Caption
People from the Tiwa community catching fish during the “Community Fishing” and Tiwa women exchanging their commodities by barter system, as part of the ‘Jonbeel Mela’ at Jonbeel lake in the ongoing 3 day long traditional bartering fair. Jagiroad, Guwahati, India. 22/01/2010. Hundreds of tribal people gather in the bazaar to exchange their commodities with other people. The festival is organized to enable plain and hill tribes of the region to exchange commodities . The mela takes its name from the lake next to which its is celebrated, the Jonbeel. This spectacular fair is held every year during winter at Jonbeel of Jagiroad, a lesser known township, only 32 kms from Guwahati. A few days before the mela, tribes like the Tiwas, Karbis, Khasi and Jaintias from the Meghalaya hills come down with various products with which to barter. On the occasion a big bazar is held where the tribes exchange their products with local people in barter system very rarely seen in today's modern societies. Before the mela they perform fire worship or agni puja for the well being of mankind. During the mela the 'govaraja' or the king of the Tiwa tribe, along with his courtiers, visits this mela and collects taxes from his subjects. The particular significance of the mela is its theme of harmony and brotherhood amongst various tribes and communities. During the 'mela' these communities perform their traditional dances and music in order to celebrate the fair in a befitting manner.
Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair228006
02/11
Caption
People from the Tiwa community catching fish during the “Community Fishing” and Tiwa women exchanging their commodities by barter system, as part of the ‘Jonbeel Mela’ at Jonbeel lake in the ongoing 3 day long traditional bartering fair. Jagiroad, Guwahati, India. 22/01/2010. Hundreds of tribal people gather in the bazaar to exchange their commodities with other people. The festival is organized to enable plain and hill tribes of the region to exchange commodities . The mela takes its name from the lake next to which its is celebrated, the Jonbeel. This spectacular fair is held every year during winter at Jonbeel of Jagiroad, a lesser known township, only 32 kms from Guwahati. A few days before the mela, tribes like the Tiwas, Karbis, Khasi and Jaintias from the Meghalaya hills come down with various products with which to barter. On the occasion a big bazar is held where the tribes exchange their products with local people in barter system very rarely seen in today's modern societies. Before the mela they perform fire worship or agni puja for the well being of mankind. During the mela the 'govaraja' or the king of the Tiwa tribe, along with his courtiers, visits this mela and collects taxes from his subjects. The particular significance of the mela is its theme of harmony and brotherhood amongst various tribes and communities. During the 'mela' these communities perform their traditional dances and music in order to celebrate the fair in a befitting manner.
Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair228011
03/11
Caption
People from the Tiwa community catching fish during the “Community Fishing” and Tiwa women exchanging their commodities by barter system, as part of the ‘Jonbeel Mela’ at Jonbeel lake in the ongoing 3 day long traditional bartering fair. Jagiroad, Guwahati, India. 22/01/2010. Hundreds of tribal people gather in the bazaar to exchange their commodities with other people. The festival is organized to enable plain and hill tribes of the region to exchange commodities . The mela takes its name from the lake next to which its is celebrated, the Jonbeel. This spectacular fair is held every year during winter at Jonbeel of Jagiroad, a lesser known township, only 32 kms from Guwahati. A few days before the mela, tribes like the Tiwas, Karbis, Khasi and Jaintias from the Meghalaya hills come down with various products with which to barter. On the occasion a big bazar is held where the tribes exchange their products with local people in barter system very rarely seen in today's modern societies. Before the mela they perform fire worship or agni puja for the well being of mankind. During the mela the 'govaraja' or the king of the Tiwa tribe, along with his courtiers, visits this mela and collects taxes from his subjects. The particular significance of the mela is its theme of harmony and brotherhood amongst various tribes and communities. During the 'mela' these communities perform their traditional dances and music in order to celebrate the fair in a befitting manner.
Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair227997
04/11
Caption
People from the Tiwa community catching fish during the “Community Fishing” and Tiwa women exchanging their commodities by barter system, as part of the ‘Jonbeel Mela’ at Jonbeel lake in the ongoing 3 day long traditional bartering fair. Jagiroad, Guwahati, India. 22/01/2010. Hundreds of tribal people gather in the bazaar to exchange their commodities with other people. The festival is organized to enable plain and hill tribes of the region to exchange commodities . The mela takes its name from the lake next to which its is celebrated, the Jonbeel. This spectacular fair is held every year during winter at Jonbeel of Jagiroad, a lesser known township, only 32 kms from Guwahati. A few days before the mela, tribes like the Tiwas, Karbis, Khasi and Jaintias from the Meghalaya hills come down with various products with which to barter. On the occasion a big bazar is held where the tribes exchange their products with local people in barter system very rarely seen in today's modern societies. Before the mela they perform fire worship or agni puja for the well being of mankind. During the mela the 'govaraja' or the king of the Tiwa tribe, along with his courtiers, visits this mela and collects taxes from his subjects. The particular significance of the mela is its theme of harmony and brotherhood amongst various tribes and communities. During the 'mela' these communities perform their traditional dances and music in order to celebrate the fair in a befitting manner.
Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair227998
05/11
Caption
People from the Tiwa community catching fish during the “Community Fishing” and Tiwa women exchanging their commodities by barter system, as part of the ‘Jonbeel Mela’ at Jonbeel lake in the ongoing 3 day long traditional bartering fair. Jagiroad, Guwahati, India. 22/01/2010. Hundreds of tribal people gather in the bazaar to exchange their commodities with other people. The festival is organized to enable plain and hill tribes of the region to exchange commodities . The mela takes its name from the lake next to which its is celebrated, the Jonbeel. This spectacular fair is held every year during winter at Jonbeel of Jagiroad, a lesser known township, only 32 kms from Guwahati. A few days before the mela, tribes like the Tiwas, Karbis, Khasi and Jaintias from the Meghalaya hills come down with various products with which to barter. On the occasion a big bazar is held where the tribes exchange their products with local people in barter system very rarely seen in today's modern societies. Before the mela they perform fire worship or agni puja for the well being of mankind. During the mela the 'govaraja' or the king of the Tiwa tribe, along with his courtiers, visits this mela and collects taxes from his subjects. The particular significance of the mela is its theme of harmony and brotherhood amongst various tribes and communities. During the 'mela' these communities perform their traditional dances and music in order to celebrate the fair in a befitting manner.
Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair227999
06/11
Caption
People from the Tiwa community catching fish during the “Community Fishing” and Tiwa women exchanging their commodities by barter system, as part of the ‘Jonbeel Mela’ at Jonbeel lake in the ongoing 3 day long traditional bartering fair. Jagiroad, Guwahati, India. 22/01/2010. Hundreds of tribal people gather in the bazaar to exchange their commodities with other people. The festival is organized to enable plain and hill tribes of the region to exchange commodities . The mela takes its name from the lake next to which its is celebrated, the Jonbeel. This spectacular fair is held every year during winter at Jonbeel of Jagiroad, a lesser known township, only 32 kms from Guwahati. A few days before the mela, tribes like the Tiwas, Karbis, Khasi and Jaintias from the Meghalaya hills come down with various products with which to barter. On the occasion a big bazar is held where the tribes exchange their products with local people in barter system very rarely seen in today's modern societies. Before the mela they perform fire worship or agni puja for the well being of mankind. During the mela the 'govaraja' or the king of the Tiwa tribe, along with his courtiers, visits this mela and collects taxes from his subjects. The particular significance of the mela is its theme of harmony and brotherhood amongst various tribes and communities. During the 'mela' these communities perform their traditional dances and music in order to celebrate the fair in a befitting manner.
Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair228002
07/11
Caption
People from the Tiwa community catching fish during the “Community Fishing” and Tiwa women exchanging their commodities by barter system, as part of the ‘Jonbeel Mela’ at Jonbeel lake in the ongoing 3 day long traditional bartering fair. Jagiroad, Guwahati, India. 22/01/2010. Hundreds of tribal people gather in the bazaar to exchange their commodities with other people. The festival is organized to enable plain and hill tribes of the region to exchange commodities . The mela takes its name from the lake next to which its is celebrated, the Jonbeel. This spectacular fair is held every year during winter at Jonbeel of Jagiroad, a lesser known township, only 32 kms from Guwahati. A few days before the mela, tribes like the Tiwas, Karbis, Khasi and Jaintias from the Meghalaya hills come down with various products with which to barter. On the occasion a big bazar is held where the tribes exchange their products with local people in barter system very rarely seen in today's modern societies. Before the mela they perform fire worship or agni puja for the well being of mankind. During the mela the 'govaraja' or the king of the Tiwa tribe, along with his courtiers, visits this mela and collects taxes from his subjects. The particular significance of the mela is its theme of harmony and brotherhood amongst various tribes and communities. During the 'mela' these communities perform their traditional dances and music in order to celebrate the fair in a befitting manner.
Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair228003
08/11
Caption
People from the Tiwa community catching fish during the “Community Fishing” and Tiwa women exchanging their commodities by barter system, as part of the ‘Jonbeel Mela’ at Jonbeel lake in the ongoing 3 day long traditional bartering fair. Jagiroad, Guwahati, India. 22/01/2010. Hundreds of tribal people gather in the bazaar to exchange their commodities with other people. The festival is organized to enable plain and hill tribes of the region to exchange commodities . The mela takes its name from the lake next to which its is celebrated, the Jonbeel. This spectacular fair is held every year during winter at Jonbeel of Jagiroad, a lesser known township, only 32 kms from Guwahati. A few days before the mela, tribes like the Tiwas, Karbis, Khasi and Jaintias from the Meghalaya hills come down with various products with which to barter. On the occasion a big bazar is held where the tribes exchange their products with local people in barter system very rarely seen in today's modern societies. Before the mela they perform fire worship or agni puja for the well being of mankind. During the mela the 'govaraja' or the king of the Tiwa tribe, along with his courtiers, visits this mela and collects taxes from his subjects. The particular significance of the mela is its theme of harmony and brotherhood amongst various tribes and communities. During the 'mela' these communities perform their traditional dances and music in order to celebrate the fair in a befitting manner.
Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair228004
09/11
Caption
People from the Tiwa community catching fish during the “Community Fishing” and Tiwa women exchanging their commodities by barter system, as part of the ‘Jonbeel Mela’ at Jonbeel lake in the ongoing 3 day long traditional bartering fair. Jagiroad, Guwahati, India. 22/01/2010. Hundreds of tribal people gather in the bazaar to exchange their commodities with other people. The festival is organized to enable plain and hill tribes of the region to exchange commodities . The mela takes its name from the lake next to which its is celebrated, the Jonbeel. This spectacular fair is held every year during winter at Jonbeel of Jagiroad, a lesser known township, only 32 kms from Guwahati. A few days before the mela, tribes like the Tiwas, Karbis, Khasi and Jaintias from the Meghalaya hills come down with various products with which to barter. On the occasion a big bazar is held where the tribes exchange their products with local people in barter system very rarely seen in today's modern societies. Before the mela they perform fire worship or agni puja for the well being of mankind. During the mela the 'govaraja' or the king of the Tiwa tribe, along with his courtiers, visits this mela and collects taxes from his subjects. The particular significance of the mela is its theme of harmony and brotherhood amongst various tribes and communities. During the 'mela' these communities perform their traditional dances and music in order to celebrate the fair in a befitting manner.
Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair228005
10/11
Caption
People from the Tiwa community catching fish during the “Community Fishing” and Tiwa women exchanging their commodities by barter system, as part of the ‘Jonbeel Mela’ at Jonbeel lake in the ongoing 3 day long traditional bartering fair. Jagiroad, Guwahati, India. 22/01/2010. Hundreds of tribal people gather in the bazaar to exchange their commodities with other people. The festival is organized to enable plain and hill tribes of the region to exchange commodities . The mela takes its name from the lake next to which its is celebrated, the Jonbeel. This spectacular fair is held every year during winter at Jonbeel of Jagiroad, a lesser known township, only 32 kms from Guwahati. A few days before the mela, tribes like the Tiwas, Karbis, Khasi and Jaintias from the Meghalaya hills come down with various products with which to barter. On the occasion a big bazar is held where the tribes exchange their products with local people in barter system very rarely seen in today's modern societies. Before the mela they perform fire worship or agni puja for the well being of mankind. During the mela the 'govaraja' or the king of the Tiwa tribe, along with his courtiers, visits this mela and collects taxes from his subjects. The particular significance of the mela is its theme of harmony and brotherhood amongst various tribes and communities. During the 'mela' these communities perform their traditional dances and music in order to celebrate the fair in a befitting manner.
Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair228010
11/11
Caption
People from the Tiwa community catching fish during the “Community Fishing” and Tiwa women exchanging their commodities by barter system, as part of the ‘Jonbeel Mela’ at Jonbeel lake in the ongoing 3 day long traditional bartering fair. Jagiroad, Guwahati, India. 22/01/2010. Hundreds of tribal people gather in the bazaar to exchange their commodities with other people. The festival is organized to enable plain and hill tribes of the region to exchange commodities . The mela takes its name from the lake next to which its is celebrated, the Jonbeel. This spectacular fair is held every year during winter at Jonbeel of Jagiroad, a lesser known township, only 32 kms from Guwahati. A few days before the mela, tribes like the Tiwas, Karbis, Khasi and Jaintias from the Meghalaya hills come down with various products with which to barter. On the occasion a big bazar is held where the tribes exchange their products with local people in barter system very rarely seen in today's modern societies. Before the mela they perform fire worship or agni puja for the well being of mankind. During the mela the 'govaraja' or the king of the Tiwa tribe, along with his courtiers, visits this mela and collects taxes from his subjects. The particular significance of the mela is its theme of harmony and brotherhood amongst various tribes and communities. During the 'mela' these communities perform their traditional dances and music in order to celebrate the fair in a befitting manner.
  • Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair227996
  • Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair228006
  • Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair228011
  • Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair227997
  • Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair227998
  • Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair227999
  • Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair228002
  • Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair228003
  • Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair228004
  • Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair228005
  • Jonbeel Mela  Traditional Bartering Fair228010

DMTX. People from the Tiwa community catching fish during the “Community Fishing” and Tiwa women exchanging their commodities by barter system, as part of the ‘Jonbeel Mela’ at Jonbeel lake in the ong

People from the Tiwa community catching fish during the “Community Fishing” and Tiwa women exchanging their commodities by barter system, as part of the ‘Jonbeel Mela’ at Jonbeel lake in the ongoing 3 day long traditional bartering fair. Jagiroad, Guwahati, India. 22/01/2010.

Hundreds of tribal people gather in the bazaar to exchange their commodities with other people. The festival is organized to enable plain and hill tribes of the region to exchange commodities . The mela takes its name from the lake next to which its is celebrated, the Jonbeel.

This spectacular fair is held every year during winter at Jonbeel of Jagiroad, a lesser known township, only 32 kms from Guwahati. A few days before the mela, tribes like the Tiwas, Karbis, Khasi and Jaintias from the Meghalaya hills come down with various products with which to barter. On the occasion a big bazar is held where the tribes exchange their products with local people in barter system very rarely seen in today's modern societies.

Before the mela they perform fire worship or agni puja for the well being of mankind. During the mela the 'govaraja' or the king of the Tiwa tribe, along with his courtiers, visits this mela and collects taxes from his subjects. The particular significance of the mela is its theme of harmony and brotherhood amongst various tribes and communities. During the 'mela' these communities perform their traditional dances and music in order to celebrate the fair in a befitting manner.

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