Demotix.com The home of World-Leading Photojournalism 30,000 contributors. 212 territories. Photos. Videos. News.

Hindu Temples of Karachi

Hindu Temples of Karachi172574
01/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172576
02/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172577
03/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172590
04/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172592
05/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172594
06/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172601
07/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172612
08/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172615
09/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172620
10/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172621
11/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172622
12/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172628
13/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172630
14/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172632
15/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172636
16/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
Hindu Temples of Karachi172637
17/17
Caption
The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009. Laxmi Narayan Panghat Mandir, situated beside the Native Jetty, (Neti-Jeti in the vernacular) once held a special significance for Hindu women, who came here for performing the ritual purification bath. Goddess Laxmi and Lord Narain also appeared here. It was originally here that out of reverence for this pious place that some tears fell from the eyes of Lord Narayan and Bindu Sarovar, a fresh water pound came into being immediately after that. Over the last few decades the devotees numbers have decreased owing to encroachment upon the premises by some politicians and other influential people. The aesthetic beauty of the temple has been marred owing to the construction of the Jinnah Over Bridge Extension. Besides, the women devotees hesitate to visit the site because of late the area has become a hunting ground for lecherous young men, especially during the festivals of Rakhi, Ganpati, Karwa Chauth, Holi and Diwali. Some distance away from this temple used to be the Hanuman Mandir at Frere Market Road that was abandoned after Babri Masjid debacle. Today, a cryptic sign reading KESC-208 is painted on the door. Few people are aware that Pakistan has Vedic temples prima au pareil (unparallel) languishing for want of care and dying a dusty death. Umpteen temples have vanished from the skyline of the prominent cities of Karachi, Lahore, Rawalpindi, Sindh and Islamabad. The clue as to how briskly they have disappeared is provided by the fact that at the time of Independence, some 424 Hindi temples dotted the landscape of Karachi alongwith a synagogue, several gurudwaras and a number of churches. Over the years, however, the temples have disappeared one by one, leaving alone only a handful of places where the city's Hindu residents may worship. majority of Karachi's temples were converted into Government schools while some were turned into private residences. The rest of the temples remained more or less undisturbed after partition. Few remaining temples have always been under threat from the city's notorious land mafia. In many cases, the courtyards and grounds surrounding these structures, have already been encroached. But more shocking is the fact that the custodians of the temples themselves joined hands with the land grabbers. While the administration turns a blind eye to the plunder, a vital part of the city's cultural heritage is fast disappearing. In the days that followed the aftermath of the Babri Masjid demolition by the frenzied mob in Faizabad, the Hindu temples all across Pakistan came under attack from rioting crowds. The temples that were destroyed in Karachi and Peshawar in those days of unbridled hate, were never rebuilt. Rather, the land on which they were constructed, was quietly sold off to real estate developers. Some temples have been rebuilt but they are few. Even Al-Bairuni wrote an interesting history of the temple in his 'Kitab-ul-Hind' where he depicts that he learnt Sanskrit and science at Katas. Not only this, quite interestingly, he even learnt many Vedic traditions. Renowned historian Panikkar states that 'Kitab-ul-Hind' brings a very honest and first-hand account of history at that time. It is also mentioned in Bairuni's book that Katas happened to be the most revered Mandir after Punjab's Jwalamukhi Mandir. This fact is also confirmed by Liaqat Ali Khan Niyazi, the Deputy Commissioner of Chakwal. Al-Bairuni also mentioned about other Pakistani temples like Panch Mukhi ka Hanuman Mandir, Nagnath Baba Mandir and Darya Lal Mandir. The grounds of the famous Nagnath Bawa Mandir in Karachi have been occupied by a businessman housing a soap factory. Though the owner claims to have brought it legally from the Karachi Building Control Authority (KBCA), Hindu residents of the area dispute the claim. The historic importance of this temple is that once Lord Shankar wanted to lead peaceful existence for some time and he came here. He took the permission of Anant Vasudevji, who gladly agreed and desired that the deity visited this place regularly even later on. It was managed by a local trust of the Hindu community that has no influence in the area. Not very distant is the Preedy Police Station adjacent to which is the Preedy Mandir at Sadar. It was occupied by the dreaded land mafia in that area. The trustees of the temple said that it was owing to a nexus between the land grabbers, police and politicians. Similarly, there is Narayan Mandir, situated at MA Jinnah Road, just opposite the head office of the Karachi Municipal Corporation. Presently, it has been managed by the All-Pakistan Hindu Panchayat Committee and community leaders. It is known for colourful festivals. The shopkeepers on the road have not only encroached upon its premises but also started storing their merchandise in the temple compound. Raja Dharampal Varma, an office bearer, states that initially the shopkeepers said that they were sitting there only to avoid the heat during the summer. But, slowly they started using the premises as a warehouse. That's why they sealed the rear gate of the temple for fear of an attack by the fanatics. There are lots more other stories about these temples situated in Karachi. Inshallah in future I will upload more stories about them.
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172574
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172576
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172577
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172590
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172592
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172594
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172601
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172612
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172615
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172620
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172621
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172622
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172628
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172630
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172632
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172636
  • Hindu Temples of Karachi172637
This content has not been independently verified.

The Hindu temples of Karachi, some of which are deteriorating due to neglect, nearby construction projects and land encroachment. Karachi, Pakistan, 04/11/2009.

Submitted by
Disclaimer

Please note: the text contained in "Hindu Temples of Karachi" has not been corrected, edited or verified by Demotix and is the raw text submitted by the photojournalist. All views and opinions expressed are that of the independent photojournalist and do not represent the views of Demotix Ltd. These details have been included in order to provide as much information as possible to the Media buyer.